What Makes A Gadget Appealing To Women?


When I was a kid it was my father who would pick out the big ticket electronics for our house, primarily because my mother couldn't care less what size the TV was or the quality of the home's sound system. While I respect her choice to not care at all, her attitude toward technology and gadgets couldn't be more different than mine. And it makes me wonder if that's an attitude I picked up along the way because I always went to the electronics store with my dad or because technology is more geared toward women these days.

According to a New York Times article, To Appeal to Women, Too, Gadgets Go Beyond ‘Cute’ and ‘Pink’, the idea of making gadgets female friendly has evolved a lot more than the average consumer might think in the past few years. More women are taking control of the technology they bring into their homes and lives and using that technology more often. To which I smartly say: Doy! Here's more:

Only a few years ago, feminizing a consumer electronic product meant little more than creating a pink or pastel version of the same black or silvery item coveted by men. And, some retailers note, that kind of marketing still goes on. But feminizing technology is more about a product’s fundamentals, often expressed in its ease of use. It is not always aimed exclusively at women, but it is female friendly. Shoppers see it throughout electronics store from the rising popularity of digital picture frames to flat-panel televisions that are designed to fit into the cabinets and armoires that once housed smaller-screened traditional televisions by moving the TV speakers from the sides to the top or bottom of the TV.

According to the article, there are some less obvious choices that have sprung up along the way. Apparently, the spacing of the keys on a new Sony ultraportable computer notebook accommodates to longer finger nails and some recent LG cell phones have the cameras’ automatic focus calibrated to arms’ length. I think these "changes" are rather lame technique for bringing in female techies, but I guess they deserve a nod for their effort. Have you noticed any changes in technology over the last few decades that you think are a marketing ploy to attract women? And what draws you to certain gadgets and not others?

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