What To Look For In A Wedding Videographer


Most couples dream about their wedding day for years and then are shocked when the day breezes past and is so busy they can hardly remember talking to their Auntie Anne or cramming cake into their beloved's face. In fact, the Wedding and Event Videographers Association reports that prior to their weddings, barely 50 percent of brides list videography as a Top 10 item. However, after the weddings 79 percent place videography among their Top 10 items for wedding planning.

If you decide to take the wedding video route, you should take just as much - if not more - care hiring the videographer as you would the photographer or wedding planner because their vision and creation will last forever.

"My idea of a wedding video for the bride and groom is to turn that day into a motion picture that they can relive time and time again," says DC-based videographer Nick Gay. "From an editor's view point, I like to have multiple angles to edit with, which means two cameras at the very least - a wide master shot and another camera to get the nice close up shots the smile from the bride, the kiss, hand holding etc."

If you don't know of a great videographer or don't want to dish out the dough for a celebrity filmmaker, Gay suggests finding a videographer from reputable directory, such as the
Nationwide Directory of Event Video Professionals or local company with a developed website that includes sample videos, photo galleries and even testimonials. While it's easy and cheap to convince your cousin Gary to video tape your special day, if you hire a production company to do it, you'll get the added bonus of their equipment, team and experience. "Always ask for a demo tape and videos from a few weddings they've done before you hire someone," adds Gay. "Video is considered art to most and it can be subjective." No one wants to be edited to look like bridezilla, so what should you be looking for? read more

What To Ask
After you figure out costs, make sure your videographer plans on attending your rehearsal, so you know he or she will have a clear understanding of the plan. Also, make sure you talk about audio and decide if you want your video to be set to music, or if you want your videographer to record sound. Find out how many manned cameras will be used and if there will be lighting complications. If you don't want to set up a big light kit around the alter or bride and groom table, discussing lighting gives you the chance to relocate prime video moments to make for better footage. It's also okay for you to ask about editing and let the videographer know what you want. That way, you'll get what you want.

Things To Remember
It's your wedding and your video. If the videographer has a set style in all his or her sample videos, your video will likely turn out similar. If you don't like it, find someone else or speak up about what you want. Also, some makeup and wedding fashions look better in real life then they do on screen.

When In Doubt, Act Natural
Lastly, have fun with it. The best weddings and wedding videos showcase the couple in their natural light. Make sure the videographer knows you want to show your personality, but let the day unfold as it would if even if the cameras were off. That way your video will come out natural, beautiful and will be a better representation of what the day was like for you.

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