Portable Scanner DocuPen Brings Out Inner Bond


One of my favorite parts of spy movies, aside from hotties like Daniel Craig, are the fabulous gadgets that aid the spy in hunting down the bad guys and uncovering deep dark secrets. When they're not saved in encrypted files, those secrets are often hidden on manuscripts and if the spy is lucky, he'll have a nifty scanner ring, camera or locket to record his findings.

I'm no 007, but the prospect of using a Docupen portable scanner was pretty alluring. The actual pen is much smaller than I expected: It's obviously as wide as a piece of paper and as thick as about three Bic pens. After loading the software onto my computer, I whipped out my copy of this month's Technology Review, selected a color page (it's actually a color scanner!) and whipped out the pen.

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To read my review and check out the scan, read more

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It took me a few tries to actually scan a document - mostly because I am impatient and was sliding the pen down the page much too fast - but the final result was a clear, colorful scan . There was some text that looks slightly italic in the scan but I assume that's due to my shaky hands because the main image looks as clear as a scan from the stationery office scanner.

From what I've read, the scanner can store up to 200 scanned documents, which makes it ideal for a paralegal, lawyer, writer, teacher or anyone who has to deal with a mess of documents everyday. It has controls for black and white, 24 bit color, 12 bit color, high resolution, standard resolution (I used standard resolution) and of course battery level and power. It costs $299.99, which is to par to a regular scanner, but clearly, a regular scanner cannot fit in your purse or hidden jacket pocket.

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