Museums and Technology That Are Tax Deductible

6 Tax Breaks For Science and Technology Enthusiasts

The tax man is sneaking up; with this year's deadline to file income taxes on Tuesday, April 17, don't spare one second to get your finances in order. If you're in fear of owing money, there may be some deductions you never realized were available just by being your science- and tech-savvy self! Check to see if you qualify for any of the six possible tax breaks below, and include them when you file your taxes.

  • Science museum memberships — As a member of a museum, a portion of your membership contribution dollars should be tax deductible. Check with the museum staff to see how much the membership donations can be claimed with Uncle Sam.
  • Science education — If you're currently in school there are major tax breaks to be had to offset college costs. There is some upside to cramming all night for the biochem final after all.
  • Buy a raffle ticket to space in support of charity — As io9 explains, you can buy a raffle ticket for a suborbital ride with Trans Lunar Research, which is a tax-exempt nonprofit. If you don't win, that gamble can be written off as a charitable contribution; if you do win, the value of the journey would need to be reported to the IRS as income.
  • Computer costs — Had to buy a computer for use in your everyday work life? If that computer is a requirement of your company, then its value can be added to your list of tax deductions.
  • Science or technology magazines — In any career you'll want to stay up to date with the happenings of your field, and IRS-approved tax deductions on relevant magazines in your industry make it that much easier to do so. Lucky you for getting to keep up with the world of science in and out of the office!
  • Volunteering at your child's science fair — Just kidding, as far as we know taking an interest in your kid's school science programs won't affect Tax Day, but just having a child will earn you a tax credit.
  • Source: Flickr User 401K

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